View Poll Results: Have you ever played pen-and-paper Pathfinder?

Voters
40. You may not vote on this poll
  • No, never.

    7 17.50%
  • Yes, once or twice in my life.

    4 10.00%
  • I play regularly.

    12 30.00%
  • I'm a DM.

    17 42.50%
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 30 of 30
  1. #21
    Community Manager k0tarsis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    246
    I think I should be ashamed to admit I really liked Mass Effect 2 (streamlined, shooter RPG lite game!)
    You know, I'm often very selective about admitting what things I like. Usually I think it makes sense - people are quick to judge, and it's pretty much impossible not to judge in some circumstances. If someone says "I like Minecraft", it makes a vastly different impression than if they said "I like Baldur's Gate II". Even though they might like both at the same time!
    But now, I'm starting to wonder whether it "muddles the waters" of the collective discourse too much. Maybe if people were less concerned about admitting such things, there would be less silly prejudices and stigma connected to a person's tastes.

  2. #22
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Massachusetts, USA
    Posts
    72
    @k0tarsis, to your question, I personally feel cRPGs should be about improving on the pnp experience and not trying to be very faithful to the pnp experience. For me many aspects of pnp gaming are rather frustrating and tedious, having to take turns being a prime example. Furthermore, whereas pnp gaming by its very nature is about you gaming with a group of friends, cRPGs are about strictly playing by myself. I do not do group computer gaming, one, because as I've gotten older I no longer have a group with whom I can very regularly play as everyone has their own schedule and their own separate game preferences, and two, playing cRPGs is my retreat and sanctuary from the "real world" where I really don't want to have to deal with other people. So a strictly single-player experience but in a party-based game is the perfect balance for me, and this is what I want a developer to perfect in my cRPGs.

  3. #23
    Senior Member purpleblob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    368
    Quote Originally Posted by k0tarsis View Post
    So what do you guys think overall of the divide between PnP RPGs and CRPGs? Is there any overlap at all? Or are the experiences nothing alike? Making PF:KM as close to tabletop as possible was one of our goals, but, frankly, I think it's such a complex topic there's still much things we don't really know.
    As I mentioned previously, I never played PnP but I have some board gaming experience. For me, I played board games to socialise - i.e. *who* I play with was more important than *what* I play in this situation. Some games could be more fun than others but at the end of the day, if the group of people I play the game with are fun bunch, then I enjoyed the session.

    cRPG is different. Like Kanisatha, I enjoy playing cRPG on my own - I don't like conflicting with other players on combat strategy, choosing dialogue options, and deciding on party compositions etc.

    I love being immersed into the engrossing story, engaging dialogues, beautiful world packed with interesting lore. I want to take all the time in the world to do that. Of course, it is important for PnP ruleset to be translated into cRPG properly too but I think I would place more emphasis on other factors I mentioned above.


    Quote Originally Posted by k0tarsis View Post
    You know, I'm often very selective about admitting what things I like. Usually I think it makes sense - people are quick to judge, and it's pretty much impossible not to judge in some circumstances. If someone says "I like Minecraft", it makes a vastly different impression than if they said "I like Baldur's Gate II". Even though they might like both at the same time!
    But now, I'm starting to wonder whether it "muddles the waters" of the collective discourse too much. Maybe if people were less concerned about admitting such things, there would be less silly prejudices and stigma connected to a person's tastes.
    You see, the "shame" bit comes in because it feels like me enjoying ME2 (or other streamed lined games) encourage developers to work on games like that only. While I really enjoyed ME2, it is not one of my favourites games - it was very fun the first time but I just could not replay it. It was just too... shallow.

    What I really want is to see more games like Pathfinder: Kingmaker. I seriously haven't had this much fun since early 2000s (BG2, NWN and IWD era). So, please Owlcat Games team, bring us more gems like Kingmaker!! :D

  4. #24
    Senior Member Pathfinder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Stolen Lands
    Posts
    650
    Quote Originally Posted by k0tarsis View Post
    So what do you guys think overall of the divide between PnP RPGs and CRPGs? Is there any overlap at all? Or are the experiences nothing alike? Making PF:KM as close to tabletop as possible was one of our goals, but, frankly, I think it's such a complex topic there's still much things we don't really know.
    Say, for me, the most important part is how a game makes me feel. So how the hell do you make a CRPG feel like PnP? Have we actually managed that? If so/if not, why?
    I think that in computer games conflicts and that kind of mechanical stuff is kind of faster and easier to calculate (computer do it, so you do not need to). Example: even a huge large fight can be over soon if you do not do it like me and pause pretty much automatic in every turn and choose what everyone is doing. But even still it is kind of rare to have multiple hour battles, or even 30min.

    Another big difference is: because fights are kind of "easy" to do in computer we usually get WAY more of them. But what most of us think when we talk from RPG, LARP and stuff like that we get bit (a lot) less. In P&P or LARP we might get one evening with plenty of talk, relationship, spying or even trying to pick some locks and creating a feast. Maybe we get one (1) fight during that all evening.

    When we play computer RPG we most likely end up doing opposite. Fighting way more (specially for games like Icewind Dale and other "Diablo like" action roleplaying games) and actually talking with other party members and people around you way less. I can not remember computer RPG where anyone have spend let's say 1-3 hour from they life just trying to hunt something or so. Even camping is usually something we do not see (that is HUGE thing so big thank you for making it at the game).

    In computer games it just take too much time to write dialogue. Yes we do have Planescape Torment from 1999 what is kind of great exception. You are able to play RPG game without (atleast too much) fighting.
    "Road to the man's heart go through the chest"

  5. #25
    I never get to play PnP, because there is no one else near me that's into crpg (or just rpg) though I'd love to try (just no one to play with XD kinda sad)

    My fave games is BG, BG2, Neverwinter 1 and 2..

  6. #26
    I have no PnP experience. I knew no one who was playing PnP.
    My first experience with D&D was through BG, IWD and later NWN.
    And my first experience with Pathfinder was actually through this game. A colleague from work recommended this game to me.

  7. #27
    I started with BG2 and after several years (and other great computer games) I finally joined a Pathfinder PnP group. There is quite a difference between computer game and tabletop, but I find them to complement each other well: Computer games are (almost) always available and you don't have to deal with the downsides of fellow players, tabletop allows way more freedom (unless the GM is restrictive) and interaction with fellow players can be fun.

    A few years after becoming as a PnP player, I took the GM's seat for a published adventure path: Giantslayer, which was the newest AP out there - it turned out to be mediocre though. I switched to a homebrew campaign, luckily kept most of the players and we are at the lofty heights of level 14 now. It's a good ride so far, and I am looking forward to the next campaign already.

    If you are curious about playing PnP, I recommend to simply give it a try. There are web pages to find a local group - if this doesn't work out, you can still play online, via Roll20, forums etc.. Chances are that the group is not the perfect fit - don't hesitate to leave if things seriously become unfun. Don't get discouraged, there are many different groups (and GMs) out there.

    GMing is a different beast. If you are into creating things and don't mind some work, there is a good chance you could make a fine GM. After playing several sessions (preferably with different GMs) it's maybe worth a try to lead a single session for a few friends. Preparation will need many hours, you won't get everything right - but first steps are never easy. And in my opinion, the unique rewards of GMing are worth the trouble: See how players have fun with your creations, make them sweat with your encounters, let them sympathize with or hate your NPCs and surprise them with turns and twists.

  8. #28
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Posts
    114
    I prefer D&D 5e and the Forgotten Realms as well as the Chronicles of Darkness, although I do own Pathfinder novels. I might buy Shadowrun 6th Edition.

  9. #29
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    city of new beginnings
    Posts
    2
    Been playing since 2nd edition, 3.0/3.5 than Pathfinder, played in Pathfinder Society, created my world back 2nd edition and upgraded to Pathfinder and been running it for the past 22 years.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Triordinant's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    The Dark Side of the Moon
    Posts
    119
    Quote Originally Posted by kaibrightwing View Post
    Been playing since 2nd edition, 3.0/3.5 than Pathfinder, played in Pathfinder Society, created my world back 2nd edition and upgraded to Pathfinder and been running it for the past 22 years.
    Our old group created a shared world for AD&D 1st Edition in 1984. It got mothballed in 2004 when most of the members spread out geographically but I still have a hardbound sourcebook that we self-published for it 15 years ago that was updated for D&D 3.5.

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •